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tofu

Tofu

A versatile staple found in almost every Asian cuisine.

Tofu: lots of people love it, some people… don’t. We think everyone would love tofu if they just gave it a chance and realized how much it can do.

While it might look like a funky white blob, tofu is essentially pressed soy curd. It’s common throughout east and Southeast Asian cuisines and has been for a very long time; Chinese documents show it’s been around there for at least 2,000 years. While likely invented in China, tofu was introduced to Japan about 1,300 years ago, then Vietnam and Southeast Asia about 1,000 years ago. In other words, it’s been around for a while.

Tofu comes in many different forms — including minimally pressed, pickled, or fermented “stinky” tofu — but the most common “processed” form in North America is divided into multiple firmness levels from silken to extra firm. All these different types and its porous, flavor-soaking nature means there’s endless ways to make tofu delicious. For example, silken or other soft- and medium-firmness tofus are often used in soups and stews like sundubu jjigae or miso soup. On the other side of the spectrum, firm and extra firm tofus can be deep fried or pan-fried with vegetables or noodles. That being said, don’t for a moment think those are the only ways for these types of tofu to be cooked. The options are practically endless!

Along with being delicious, tofu has numerous healthy qualities. It’s high in protein without the higher saturated fat and cholesterol levels associated with animal protein, plus has lots of amino acids and minerals. At Uwajimaya, you’ll find tofu in our refrigerated coolers.

Languages
  • Chinese
    Doufu
  • English
    Soybean Curd
  • Filipino
    Taho

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