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Chinese Chives Food Art | Uwajimaya

Chinese Chives

While chives are used in many cuisines around the world, Chinese chives have a stronger flavor than their Western counterparts. They’re used in many different dishes: dumplings, stir fries, soups, savory pastries, baked goods — seemingly anything!

These chives also appear in a yellow variety, in Cantonese called either gau wong or gau choi depending on which part of the chive plant you’re referring to. Yellow chives end up this color because they’re grown in the dark, so they don’t produce as much chlorophyll as they mature. The end result is a chive that’s both visually interesting and tastes softer and sweeter than standard Chinese chives. Their texture is also more delicate. While this might sound like something only horticultural experts could pull off, growing yellow chives is actually quite simple: just plant Chinese chives like normal but cover them with something that will block their light.

We’ve got all the ingredients to make whatever chive dishes you’re looking for!

Languages
  • English
    garlic chives, yellow chives
  • Japanese
    nira
  • Chinese
    gau choy, gau wong
  • Vietnamese
    la he
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